Do You Have Crotch Tingling And Pain When Stepping Off The Saddle?

Last Updated on April 6, 2021

Do You Have Crotch Tingling And Pain When Stepping Off The Saddle?

 Don’t you hate having that crotch-tingling feeling and pain when stepping off the saddle after a long ride? 

Well, you’re not the only one. 

Almost every rider suffers from crotch pain and tingling after a long ride due to the blood flow surging back to the area again. 

It can be caused by your riding position and cycling technique rather than saddle design, but certain designs have been said to relieve this pressure. 

But wait, let me tell you something.

To make things easier for you, I have broken down all the confusing features of helping with crotch pain after cycling and ways to prevent it, including your saddle choice. 

Let’s jump in!  

What causes crotch tingling, pain, and numbness after cycling?

All cyclists, both male and female, will feel pain, numbness, burning, and/or tingling in the perineal area (crotch area) after bicycling for long periods of time. 

This pain can go on for days after cycling, and in some cases, it can make it rather uncomfortable to sit down at all. 

This numbness and tingling are often caused when blood flow surges back to the area after being restricted for long periods of time.

You will notice some saddles (particularly for men) come noseless to reduce pressure around the groin (perineum). There are designs for women too that help with reducing this numbness and pain. 

How to prevent crotch pain, tingliness, and numbness: 

The common culprits that cause crotch pain are the saddle shape and saddle position, but it can also be caused by cycling and cycling for prolonged periods. 

Let’s break down the ways to prevent this:

Choosing the right saddle: 

No matter what saddle you choose, if it doesn’t fit your anatomy, it will be uncomfortable no matter how long or where you sit on it.

First, you should check that the saddle supports the ischial tuberosities’ weight (the hard bone you feel when you sit down) and your pelvic bones. 

When getting yourself a bike seat, you should measure the distance between your ischial tuberosities, as this will help when matching the appropriate width of the seat.

You should also ensure that your saddle is horizontally aligned or only slightly nose up. It is important to find a balance, if it’s pointed up too much it can directly increase the perineum pressure but one facing too far down will also increase pressure too. 

Bike seats without a protruding nose and seats with a center channel cut out have also been extremely beneficial in reducing pressure on the perineal area. 

You should also consider the stiffness of the seat rails, surface padding material, and choosing a gender-specific design to help when choosing the design best suited for you

Trying out different seats is always beneficial before you buy to work out which design is best and most comfortable. 

Adjust bicycle position: 

Lowering the seat and sitting in a more upright posture by shifting the bicycle seat forward and tilting the front of the seat downward can massively reduce the pressure in the perineal region. 

Additionally by alternating between standing and seated cycling can massively help relieve pressure around the crotch area as it will relieve pressure points on both the perineum and ischial tuberosities. 

You should try alternating between sitting and standing while cycling such as going up hills or while accelerating. 

Wear bicycling shorts: 

Bike shorts actually minimize ischial tuberosity and crotch irritation because they help ventilate airflow around the area. 

I would recommend wearing cycling shorts with thick chamois padding and breathable material to reduce pressure on the pudendal nerve.

I would recommend avoiding shorts with seam lines that overlay the ischial tuberosity and perineum as this can cause pressure in these areas. 

Applying thick cream also helps reduce friction between the skin and the lining of the shorts which also helps to prevent crotch irritation. 

Switch to recumbent biking: 

If you badly suffer from crotch pain as a result of biking, there are options such as using a recumbent bike to help with your pain. 

If you have significant issues with finding the right bicycle seat or positioning on an upright bicycle then switching to a recumbent bike may be your best bet. 

Recumbent bikes are positioned in a reclined position and often have a wider, much more comfortable seat to sit on. They don’t put any direct pressure on the crotch or perineum either. 

Saddle soreness is massively resolved by switching to a recumbent bike it puts you on a flat padded seat which relieves pressure points– plus they’re super fun to ride. 

Use Chamois Cream

This is popular amongst cycling pros and in case you’re wondering it’s pronounced “shammy” cream. This is used to decrease the friction that builds up while you’re riding in the saddle.

Be careful not to apply too much though as this should only be used in small quantities. As a point of reference, the size of a nickel should be enough cream.

While chamois is normally used and recommended with cycling shorts it can also be used with underwear and other gear.

Simply put?

Apply a small amount of the cream to the padding or if you prefer straight to the parts that tend to chafe. This should prevent you from getting a sore butt from biking.

Summary: 

Crotch pain after prolonged cycling is sometimes unavoidable, but alternating between cycling positions, choosing the right bike seat for you, and wearing appropriate clothing will massively help. 

If the pain worsens or continues, then I would recommend consulting your doctor, but in most cases, the discomfort goes away after a few days or a week or two. 

Happy biking! 

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